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Sen. Brown: Biden campaign recognizes Ohio as ‘a state we can win’

Tyler Buchanan, Ohio Capital Journal

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USDA photo by Bob Nichols.

U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown, D-Ohio, conceded that election night in 2016 was a low point for him and other Democrats throughout the country.

“I was pretty depressed and discouraged,” he told reporters Tuesday morning.

Democrats have waited four years to return to the voting booth with President Donald Trump now on the ballot again. Brown offered a similar take on Tuesday’s importance as others have in past election years.

“I think today is the most, probably the most important day in American history in my lifetime,” he said. “I’m not saying that with exaggeration or with any histrionics or hyperbole. The country is really at a crossroads.”

That’s quite a statement from an Ohioan who has been involved in many, many elections throughout his lifetime — as a candidate for various state and federal offices, along with overseeing the Ohio elections system as secretary of state from 1983 to 1991.

He described feeling pleased with Joe Biden’s decision to visit Ohio one last time on Monday, swinging by Cleveland as part of a whirlwind tour of battleground states leading up to Election Day.

“I think Biden’s people just recognize Ohio absolutely is a state we can win,” Brown said.

Polls show Biden and Trump in a statistical tie as voters head to the polls today. The Capital Journal previewed the presidential race in Ohio, which you can read here.

Here’s a few other highlights from Brown’s talk with reporters:

  • Brown predicted there would be one or two congressional flips in Democrats’ favor this cycle. As we’ve written, there are few close races expected among the 16 congressional races in Ohio this year (“They’re tough, gerrymandered districts,” Brown complained). The most contested race, Brown and political forecasters agree, looks to be in the 1st District between GOP incumbent Steve Chabot and Democratic challenger Kate Schroder.
  • Brown remained critical of what he said were Republican efforts to suppress voter turnout in Ohio and elsewhere. “I think it backfires,” he added, pointing to the record number of early votes cast this cycle.
  • Brown is not overly worried about efforts by Trump or others to prematurely proclaim victory on election night; he said reporters and “responsible people” will push back enough to let the ballot counting process continue. “The most important thing is all the votes are counted,” he said.

This story was republished from the Ohio Capital Journal under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article here.

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